The popular neurotoxin used to smooth out facial wrinkles is now increasingly in demand for treatment of certain medical conditions. According to sufferers of severe migraines or excessive sweating, a Botox® Therapeutic treatment can be ‘a life saver.’

It was an unintended but fortunate bounce to discover that the Botox medication used to temporarily paralyze facial muscle could also relieve headaches.

Doctors started studying Botox as a pain treatment after patients with migraines who used Botox for cosmetic purposes reported that their headaches were better.

According to the Mayo Clinic, which has treated thousands of migraine sufferers with Botox Therapeutic since its approval in 2002, “the specific details of how Botox works to prevent headaches are not known. But it’s likely that the injected Botox is taken up by pain receptors in the muscles’ nerves. The medication then deactivates those pain receptors and blocks pain signals that the nerves send to the brain.”

What is known … it works!

Botox injections are well-tolerated, beneficial, and appear to be safe for long-term management of chronic migraines. – Harvard Health Blog

“A majority of people will be able to reduce the frequency or severity of migraine episodes with Botox Therapeutic treatments,” says Jeanine Harrison NP, an experienced aesthetic injector and colleague at THMA Consulting. “It’s becoming more mainstream and more popular with people who have been suffering severe and frequent headaches for years.”

Jeanine advises people who have more than 15 headaches a month and have unsuccessfully tried other treatments to seek aesthetic assistance only from medical professionals who have been properly trained to assess patients and inject Botox skillfully and precisely.

Patients will learn in consultations that Botox Therapeutic from Allergan is the only neuromodulator approved for migraine pain treatment in Canada.

Treatment costs may be covered through some insurance plans, something our trained practitioners will help patients determine before they receive treatments.

“It’s been a life saver for me.” Read what a chronic migraine sufferer says about Botox Therapeutic.  

Medical aesthetics practitioners are encouraged to add this pain treatment to their professional portfolio as demand is expected to increase with positive publicity. Training must be done through Allergan.

 Treatment for excessive sweating

Hyperhidrosis, or excessive sweating, is a source of great embarrassment and diminished self-esteem for sufferers at work and in social situations. For those people who are long-term hyperhidrosis sufferers, Botox Therapeutic is highly recommended.

“It’s a ‘quality of life’ issue,” says Jeanine. “They have been struggling with hyperhidrosis for years, so they come to us looking for medical treatment to reduce the amount of sweat they produce. Botox Therapeutic has been proven effective and is highly recommended for long-time sufferers.”

Jeanine is trained in Botox Therapeutic

Before administering Botox Therapeutic, medical aesthetic professionals will want to know that patients have tried without success other means to control the sweating. That would include extra-dry antiperspirants, medication or even holistic treatments. Pads and undergarments are also unworkable options.

The trained practitioner will inject Botox Therapeutic into small muscles around sweat glands, most often under the arms, blocking the nerves responsible for activating the glands.

Most patients report good results that can last anywhere from three months to a full year.

In many cases, the treatment is life changing.

Read why actress Chrissy Teigan says Botox to prevent sweating was the ‘best move’ she ever made.

As with migraine treatments, Botox Therapeutic from Allergan is the only product approved in Canada for treatment of hyperhidrosis. And certain insurance providers will cover some costs of these treatments, too. The practitioner can provide patients with a request for treatment and cost quote to take to an insurer before proceeding with treatment.

Also Read: Young Consumers and the Increasing Popularity of ‘Preventative Botox’